Browse Exhibits (4 total)

Steele Vintage Broadcast Microphone Collection

https://web.archive.org/web/20120308130345/http://www.k-bay106.com/shure556s.jpg

The James U. Steele Vintage Broadcast Microphone Collection is one of the most comprehensive collections of American made microphones from the first half of the 20th century.

Since the birth of broadcast radio in 1906, the microphone has been the centerpiece of emerging technologies that allowed the human voice to be heard live by vast audiences. Many microphones became icons of the radio and television industry, including the RCA 44 and 77 series microphones which seemed ubiquitous in the early television era, and the Shure 55 series, dubbed “The Elvis Microphone” for its frequent appearance on stage with Elvis Presley.

Mr. James U. Steele collected 226 microphones and subsequently donated them to the University of Georgia's Special Collections Library in 2011. The collection is now housed in The Walter J. Brown Media Archives in the Library, and can frequently be found on display in the Archives' exhibition space.

,

Foxfire on Display at UGA: 50 years of Cultural Journalism Documenting folk Life in the North Georgia Mountains, September-December 2016

Foxfire Family Day Children's Quilt.jpg

In 1966, a young teacher at the Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School was struggling to engage his high school English students. In frustration he asked them what they thought would make the curriculum more interesting. As a result of this conversation, Eliot Wigginton and his students set out to start a magazine, called Foxfire, to document the trades, crafts and livelihoods of their Appalachian elders. By recording the remarkable stories and extraordinary talents of their families and neighbors, students used the community around them as a learning tool and a means to bring their mountain culture to readers around the world. Articles written by students highlight the mountain traditions that were and still are at risk of being forgotten with the passage of time.


The Foxfire magazine, 50 years later, continues to fascinate readers with the world of Appalachian pioneer folk culture. Today, students in the Foxfire classroom at Rabun County High School produce two double-issues each school year. Foxfire fans can also visit the 106-acre Foxfire Museum & Heritage Center in Mountain City, Georgia. This Appalachian heritage center serves as a museum, a hands-on classroom, a venue for events, a repository for artifacts and a remarkable glimpse of a rich and engaging past.

,

Covered With Glory: Football at UGA, 1892-1917

photo_album_0068_1906circa_socialmedia_edit_twitter.jpg
 
'Alma Mater' echoed over the hills.  'Glory, Glory to Old Georgia' in its wake. 
- Atlanta Journal, October 31, 1915
 

This is a digital exhibit examining the early history of the University of Georgia football program, 1892-1917.  These years saw the formation of the program, the establishment of several traditions and rivalries which carry on to the current day, and the careers of several prominent players and coaches.  

This digital exhibit is concurrent with a physical exhibit that will be on display at the Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries Building from August 31 through December 22,  2017, though this website will be available online after the physical exhibit has been removed.

Further research into the history of University of Georgia athletics can be done through the collections of the Hargrett Library, which holds the archives of the University as well as the archives of the UGA Athletic Association. 

All materials and photographs in this exhibit are from the collections of the Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library.  Permission to copy or in any way re-use these images must be granted through the Hargrett Library.

For more information on the Hargrett Library, please follow us on Twitter and Instagram.  As well as updates on our collections, exhibits, and programs, we offer photos and information relating to the history of UGA and Athens.  For both services, we are @hargrettlibrary.

 

Fighting Spirit: Wally Butts and UGA Football, 1939-1950

1949practice_omeka.jpg
It was [Howell] Hollis who revealed that left end George Poschner played 55 minutes with stomach cramps, which coupled with Sinkwich's gritty play, reflects the fighting spirit of the battling Georgians.
-- Paul Lowry, Los Angeles Times. January 2, 1943

This digital exhibit explores the University of Georgia's football team during the 1940s.  This decade saw the Georgia Bulldogs reach the pinnacle of national success for the first time in the program's history, but also saw the team struggle to adjust to the changes brought about by World War 2.  

This digital exhibit is concurrent with a physical museum exhibit that will be on display at the Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries Building from September 2018 through May 2019, though this website will be available online after the physical exhibit has been removed.

Further research into the history of University of Georgia athletics can be done through the collections of the Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library, which hold the archives of the University as well as the archives of the UGA Athletic Association.

All materials and photographs in this exhibit are from the collections of the Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Permission to copy or in any way re-use these images must be granted through the Hargrett Library.

For more information on the Hargrett Library, please follow us on Twitter and Instagram.  As well as updates on our collections, exhibits, and programs, we offer photos and information relating to the history of UGA and Athens.  For both services, we are @hargrettlibrary.