Browse Exhibits (7 total)

Steele Vintage Broadcast Microphone Collection

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Since the birth of broadcast radio in 1906, the microphone has been the centerpiece of emerging technologies that allowed the human voice to be heard live by vast audiences. Many microphones became icons of the radio and television industry, including the RCA 44 and 77 series microphones which seemed ubiquitous in the early television era, and the Shure 55 series, dubbed “The Elvis Microphone” for its frequent appearance on stage with Elvis Presley.

Mr. James U. Steele collected 226 microphones and subsequently donated them to the University of Georgia's Special Collections Library in 2011. The collection is now housed in The Walter J. Brown Media Archives in the Library, and can frequently be found on display in the Archives' exhibition space.

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Covered With Glory: Football at UGA, 1892-1917

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'Alma Mater' echoed over the hills.  'Glory, Glory to Old Georgia' in its wake. 
- Atlanta Journal, October 31, 1915

This is a digital exhibit examining the early history of the University of Georgia football program, 1892-1917.  These years saw the formation of the program, the establishment of several traditions and rivalries which carry on to the current day, and the careers of several prominent players and coaches.  

This digital exhibit is concurrent with a physical exhibit that will be on display at the Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries Building from August 31 through December 22, 2017, though this website will be available online after the physical exhibit has been removed.

Further research into the history of University of Georgia athletics can be done through the collections of the Hargrett Library, which holds the archives of the University as well as the archives of the UGA Athletic Association. 

All materials and photographs in this exhibit are from the collections of the Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Permission to copy or in any way re-use these images must be granted through the Hargrett Library.

For more information on the Hargrett Library, please follow us on Twitter and Instagram. As well as updates on our collections, exhibits, and programs, we offer photos and information relating to the history of UGA and Athens. For both services, we are @hargrettlibrary.

Fighting Spirit: Wally Butts and UGA Football, 1939-1950

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It was [Howell] Hollis who revealed that left end George Poschner played 55 minutes with stomach cramps, which coupled with Sinkwich's gritty play, reflects the fighting spirit of the battling Georgians.
-- Paul Lowry, Los Angeles Times. January 2, 1943

This digital exhibit explores the University of Georgia's football team during the 1940s.  This decade saw the Georgia Bulldogs reach the pinnacle of national success for the first time in the program's history, but also saw the team struggle to adjust to the changes brought about by World War 2.  

This digital exhibit is concurrent with a physical museum exhibit that will be on display at the Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries Building from September 2018 through May 2019, though this website will be available online after the physical exhibit has been removed.

Further research into the history of University of Georgia athletics can be done through the collections of the Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library, which hold the archives of the University as well as the archives of the UGA Athletic Association.

All materials and photographs in this exhibit are from the collections of the Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Permission to copy or in any way re-use these images must be granted through the Hargrett Library.

For more information on the Hargrett Library, please follow us on Twitter and Instagram.  As well as updates on our collections, exhibits, and programs, we offer photos and information relating to the history of UGA and Athens. For both services, we are @hargrettlibrary.

The Strategies of Suffrage: Mobilizing a Nation for Women's Rights

In 1848, more than 300 attendees gathered in Seneca Falls, New York to discuss women’s rights. That meeting catalyzed an organized, national movement. In the decades that followed, suffragists gathered, discussed, spoke, wrote, performed, paraded, and protested to give American women the right to vote. They waged a determined battle for greater agency, one that united women across barriers of race and class while also revealing social tensions and racial prejudices that persisted in American society.  

This exhibit explores the women’s suffrage movement from the hosting of the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 until the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution in 1920. It focuses on the visual and verbal appeals activists used to promote their message to the public. The publications, photographs, advertisements and ephemera displayed here document the strategy and struggle of this suffrage movement.     

Acknowledgements 

This exhibit was made possible with collections and support from the Lucy Hargrett Draper Center and Archives for the Study of the Rights of Women in History and Law. In addition, we thank our curator, Sidonia Serafini; Mary Linnemann, who assisted with scanning and graphics creation; Dr. Nan McMurray, who served as an outside reader for the script; Amber Prentiss and Kathleen Kern, our tireless fact checkers; Zakkary Greene, who assisted in the production of graphics; and Celia Clark, who assisted with object retrieval and overall organization.

Unless otherwise identified, all items featured in this digital exhibit are part of the collections of the Lucy Hargrett Draper Center and Archives for the Study of the Rights of Women in History and Law at the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

Digital Pop-Up: LGBT Resource Center Records

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This digital exhibit was curated as part of a celebration of LGBT History Month 2020, and the 15th anniversary of the UGA LGBT Resource Center. The flyers, documents, and newsclippings displayed here offer a sample of items available in the LGBT Resource Center Records, a collection at the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library

If you are interested in learning more about how to view original materials at the UGA Special Collections Libraries, contact sclib@uga.edu or visit http://www.libs.uga.edu/scl/research 

Making Space: Fighting for Inclusion, Building Community at UGA

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In 1961, Hamilton Holmes and Charlayne Hunter became the first Black students to enroll at the University of Georgia. Facing down adversity, they succeeded in desegregating the campus and winning a battle in the broader struggle for civil rights. However, the process of integration and building a more inclusive university continues today. Making Space: Fighting for Inclusion, Building Community at UGA explores the stories of these trailblazing students and those that followed them in shaping the campus.

The exhibit considers the ways that Black and LGBTQ+ students have cultivated spaces for themselves at UGA since the 1960s, finding agency and building safe spaces. It will highlight their activities - how they gathered, lobbied, and protested for acceptance and change. It will consider the people and places that offered support to these students, as well as those that put up barriers to block the path forward.

Today, the university recognizes that each student is made up of many identities. The intersection of these different identities shape the perspective of each student and their experience on an ever-changing campus. Making Space will serve as a timely guide for thinking about and advocating for continued progress not just on one college campus, but within a nation that so often looks to its past as a roadmap to its future.

Acknowledgements

This exhibit was inspired by the 60th anniversary of UGA’s desegregation, and made possible through the hard work and contributions of many people on our team. Thank you to Chanara Andrews, our student curator who worked in the strange new world of 2020 to develop the exhibit script. Thank you to Steve Armour, university archives and electronic records archivist, for assisting with early discussions on content and direction and to Kat Stein, director of the Hargrett Library, for her support and encouragement. Thank you also to Mary Linnemann, who assisted with scanning and graphics creation; to Dr. Barbara McCaskill, Dr. Nan McMurray, and Patrice Green, who all served as outside readers for the script; to Diane Trap, who assisted with fact checking; and to Jan Hebbard who refined the script, selected items for display, and assisted with object retrieval and overall organization.

K-12 Resources @ UGA Special Collections

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This site provides access to the tour videos, activities, and other resources created for our in-person and virtual programmings for K-12 students.